onepainting:

Yasuhiro Onishi: Untitled 180 mm x 140mm Acrylics on PLY
@10 hours ago with 21 notes

(Source: partymanyeah, via butttdumpling)

@10 hours ago with 29068 notes

honeyyvanille:

Sometimes you need to remind yourself that you were the one who carried you through the heartache. You are the one who sits with the cold body on the shower floor, and picks it up. You are the one who feeds it, who clothes it, who tucks it into bed, and you should be proud of that. Having the strength to take care of yourself when everyone around you is trying to bleed you dry, that is the strongest thing in the universe.

(Source: sarahaliceyoung, via lonemisswolf)

@20 hours ago with 666525 notes
tolerated:

I luv her

tolerated:

I luv her

(Source: dymetaylor)

@1 day ago with 8867 notes
darylseitchik:

This will appear in a slightly different format in the upcoming “medical issue” of The Lifted Brow. 

darylseitchik:

This will appear in a slightly different format in the upcoming “medical issue” of The Lifted Brow

@2 days ago with 28 notes
justanothermasterpiece:

Heather Chontos.

justanothermasterpiece:

Heather Chontos.

@3 days ago with 52 notes
@4 days ago with 1 note
what-do-i-wear:

bassike ss14 women lookbook

what-do-i-wear:

bassike ss14 women lookbook

(via weslah)

@4 days ago with 224 notes

vintagemanga:

Beautiful 70’s Garo / ガロ covers by HAYASHI Seiichi (林静一 ).

(via hedownwithskeletor)

@10 hours ago with 4677 notes
untrustyou:

Marcus Haydock
@19 hours ago with 498 notes
what-id-wear:

What I’d Wear : The Outfit Database

(source : I Go By Frankie )
@1 day ago with 231 notes
untrustyou:

 Benedetta Falugi
@1 day ago with 321 notes

serving size: 4

yeah

all 4 me

(Source: jesusthelastairbender, via tokkicat)

@3 days ago with 466291 notes
what-id-wear:

What I’d Wear : The Outfit Database

(source : Peave Love Shea )
@3 days ago with 457 notes
archaicwonder:

Greek Gold Oak Wreath from the Dardanelles, 4th century BC
This naturalistic wreath of oak-leaves and acorns is supported on two golden branches that are now reinforced by a modern copper core. At the back the branches end in obliquely cut end-plates, at the front they are held together by a split pin fastener concealed by a golden bee. Each branch bears six sprays with eight leaves and seven or eight acorns, as well as a cicada. Additionally, about a dozen single leaves are attached directly to each branch.
Gold wreaths were made in imitation of various leaves, including oak, olive, ivy, vine, laurel and myrtle. Most of these trees or plants have associations with various deities; for example, the oak was sacred to Zeus.
Wreaths were left in burials in Macedonia, southern Italy, Asia Minor and the North Pontic area from the fourth century onwards. This wreath is said to have come from a tomb somewhere on the Dardanelles. Despite their obvious fragility, the Greek orator Demosthenes (384-322 BC) writes that gold wreaths were worn for certain religious ceremonies. The inventories of Greek temples and sanctuaries also show that large numbers of gold

archaicwonder:

Greek Gold Oak Wreath from the Dardanelles, 4th century BC

This naturalistic wreath of oak-leaves and acorns is supported on two golden branches that are now reinforced by a modern copper core. At the back the branches end in obliquely cut end-plates, at the front they are held together by a split pin fastener concealed by a golden bee. Each branch bears six sprays with eight leaves and seven or eight acorns, as well as a cicada. Additionally, about a dozen single leaves are attached directly to each branch.

Gold wreaths were made in imitation of various leaves, including oak, olive, ivy, vine, laurel and myrtle. Most of these trees or plants have associations with various deities; for example, the oak was sacred to Zeus.

Wreaths were left in burials in Macedonia, southern Italy, Asia Minor and the North Pontic area from the fourth century onwards. This wreath is said to have come from a tomb somewhere on the Dardanelles. Despite their obvious fragility, the Greek orator Demosthenes (384-322 BC) writes that gold wreaths were worn for certain religious ceremonies. The inventories of Greek temples and sanctuaries also show that large numbers of gold

(Source: math.nyu.edu)

@4 days ago with 391 notes